Goal Bank for Adult Speech Therapy (150 SLP Goals!)

We’ve put together a bank of almost 150 goals for you to use in your practice. You’re welcome!

These are the most common short term goals for adult speech therapy patients and cover all major areas of treatment, from dysphagia to AAC. The bank is organized from severe impairment to mild impairment, to help you progress your patients towards greater function and quality of life.

This goal bank is not comprehensive. Rather, it’s a starting point to help you write your own excellent goals. Edit them as appropriate based on each patient’s assessment results and unique life situations.

We’ll go over some some factors you shoulder consider when writing goals, broken down by impairment. We’ll also give you a quick formula for how to write goals.

For a more in-depth guide to writing excellent goals, check out our Goal Writing Guide:

Virtual SLP Evaluation Forms 6 Adult Eval Templates PDF image 0


What’s in This Article?

1. A quick formula for writing goals
2. How we wrote goals for the Goal Bank
3. Writing Dysphagia Goals
4. Writing Memory Goals
5. Writing Attention Goals
6. Writing Visual Neglect Goals
7. Writing Aphasia Goals (Expressive & Receptive)
8. Writing Dysarthria Goals
9. Writing Apraxia of Speech Goals
10. Writing Voice & Resonance Goals
11. Writing AAC Goals
12. Writing Fluency Goals


A quick formula for writing S.M.A.R.T. goals

1 will 2 at 3 accuracy given 4 to 5 by 6 .”

1 = The patient’s name
2 = The specific, attainable task your patient will complete
3 = The measurable accuracy
4 = The measurable amount of cueing provided
5 = The specific, relevant area of weakness
6 = The time to reach the goal

For Example:

Jin (1) will safely drink single cup sips of thin liquids sans overt s/sx of aspiration (2) in 80% of opportunities (3) given minimal verbal cues for use of safe swallowing strategies (4) in order to increase ability to consume the least restrictive diet (5) within 2 weeks (6).


How we wrote goals for the Goal Bank

The Goal Bank focuses on #2, the specific, attainable task for your patient to achieve, and on #5, their specific, relevant area of weakness.

Accuracy Level:
We use an accuracy level of 80% for most goals. Below 65% accuracy borders on “chance” levels for some goals. While above 95% gets into “mastery” territory, which often isn’t the goal of speech therapy. That said, there are frequent exceptions, especially when it comes to safety. Do what’s best for your patient.

Cues:
For Severe Impairments, we use “frequent, maximal cues”.
For Moderate Impairments, we use “intermittent, moderate cues”.
For Mild Impairment, we use “occasional, minimal cues”.

…most often! There are some exceptions.

These cues might not translate well for every patient. For example, someone with severe memory impairments may only need minimal, verbal cues. While another with mild aphasia may need frequent, moderate cues.

If the goal you’ve written ends up not being quite right for your patient, then no worries. The better you get to know them, the more accurate your goals will become. Update the goal as needed and carry on!

For more information on how to write goals, see How to Write Excellent Speech Therapy Goals.


Writing Dysphagia Goals – Factors to Consider

Liquid Textures

  • Extremely thick or Pudding thick
  • Moderately thick or Honey thick
  • Mildly thick or Nectar thick
  • Slight thick or Natural nectar thick
  • Thin

Diet Textures

  • Liquidized (similar to honey thick liquids)
  • Puree (similar to pudding thick liquids)
  • Minced & Moist or Dysphagia Mechanical
  • Soft & Bite-Sized or Mechanical soft
  • Easy to Chew or Regular

Presentation

  • Therapist fed
  • Caregiver fed
  • Self feed
  • Cup sips
    • Single cup sips, sequential cup sips
  • Straw sips
    • Single straw sips, sequential straw sips
  • Regulated straw sips (you will pinch the straw so that the patient doesn’t take too big of a sip)
  • Teaspoon
  • Spoon
    • Level spoonful
    • Heaping spoonful

Amount

  • Ounces
  • Meal amount
    • Entire breakfast/lunch/dinner/snack
    • Certain percent (%) eaten
  • Food item

Muscle Groups

  • Oral: to reduce spillage, reduce residue, increase mastication, increase bolus control
    • Labial
    • Lingual
    • Buccal
  • Oropharyngeal
  • Pharyngeal: to reduce premature spillage, laryngeal penetration, aspiration, residue, nasal regurgitation
  • Pharyngoesophageal
  • Esophageal: reduce reflux

Time Frame

  • During a meal time
  • Within a certain number of minutes

Purpose

  • Safely consume the least restrictive diet
  • Meet all nutritional needs by mouth
  • Avoid weight loss
  • Increase PO intake and decrease need for feeding tube
  • Eat for pleasure

Strategies

  • Safe Swallowing Strategies
    • Single bites and sips, bolus hold, alternating bites and sips, chin tuck, effortful swallow, dry swallow, head turn, super supraglottic swallow, slow pace
  • Energy Conservation strategies
    • Slow pace, frequent breaks, reduce distractions

Dysphagia Goal Bank

Patients who are NPO

  1. The patient will complete an instrumental evaluation (MBSS or FEES) within 1 week in order to evaluate swallowing safety.
  2. The patient will complete the Frasier Free Water Protocol at 100% accuracy given occasional minimal verbal cues for adherence to all protocol steps in order to increase hydration and adherence to diet modifications.
  3. The patient will consume 1/3 cup ice chips (cut into 1/2″ pieces or smaller) within 30 minutes sans overt s/sx of aspiration in 70% of trials for pleasure.
  4. The patient will complete trials of puree textures (8 oz or more) sans overt s/sx of aspiration in 80% of trials given minimal verbal cues to utilize safe swallowing strategies.
  5. The patient will complete trials of honey thick liquids (4 oz or more) sans overt s/sx of aspiration in 80% of trials given minimal verbal cues to utilize safe swallowing strategies.
  6. The patient will consume 80% of his meal sans overt s/sx of aspiration in 80% of trials given minimal verbal cues to utilize safe swallowing strategies in order to increase nutrition by mouth.

Patients with severe dysphagia

  1. The patient will consume puree textures sans overt s/sx of aspiration in 80% of opportunities given frequent maximal verbal and frequent maximal tactical cues to utilize safe swallowing strategies.
  2. The patient will consume moderately thick (honey thick) liquids sans overt s/sx of aspiration in 80% of opportunities given frequent maximal verbal and frequent maximal tactical cues to utilize safe swallowing strategies.
  3. The patient will consume 70% of his meal in a quiet environment sans overt s/sx of aspiration in 80% of opportunities given frequent maximal verbal and frequent maximal tactical cues to utilize safe swallowing strategies.
  4. The patient will self feed spoon sips of mildly thick (nectar thick liquids) sans overt s/sx of aspiration given frequent maximal tactical cues to utilize safe swallowing strategies.
  5. The patient will consume teaspoon bites of minced & moist food (dysphagia mechanical) presented by the caregiver sans overt s/sx of aspiration in 80% of opportunities given intermittent moderate verbal cues to utilize safe swallowing strategies.
  6. The patient will complete 20 repetitions or more of lingual strengthening exercises (lingual press, Masako maneuver, etc.) given intermittent minimal verbal cues.

Patients with moderate dysphagia

  1. The patient will consume cup sips of slightly thick liquids sans overt s/sx of aspiration in 80% of opportunities given intermittent moderate verbal cues and intermittent minimal tactile cues to utilize swallowing strategies.
  2. The patient will consume soft & bite-sized food (mechanical soft) sans overt s/sx of aspiration in 80% of opportunities given intermittent moderate verbal cues to utilize swallowing strategies.
  3. The patient will complete 20 repetition or more of pharyngeal strengthening exercises (e.g. Mendelsohn maneuver, effortful swallow, etc.) given intermittent minimal verbal cues.
  4. The patient will self feed a soft & bite-sized meal (mechanical soft) sans overt s/sx of aspiration in 80% of opportunities given frequent moderate verbal cues to utilize swallowing strategies.

Patients with mild dysphagia

  1. The patient will consume cup sips of thin liquids sans overt s/sx of aspiration given occasional minimal verbal cues for use of swallowing strategies.
  2. The patient will consume regular textures sans overt s/sx of aspiration given occasional minimal verbal cues for use of strategies.
  3. The patient will complete 20 or more pharyngeal exercises given rare minimal verbal cues.
  4. The patient will consume sequential cup sips of thin liquids (4 oz or more) sans overt s/sx of aspiration given rare minimal verbal cues for use of strategies.


Writing Cognition Goals – Factors to Consider

Complexity

  • Simple
  • Moderate
  • Complex

Response Time (for Visual Neglect & Attention goals)

  • Usually measured within seconds or minutes

Memory Goal Bank

Patients with severe memory impairments

  1. The patient will recall orientation information at 80% accuracy in immediate recall given use of visual aids and frequent minimal verbal cues.
  2. The patient will recall 4/5 memory strategies given intermittent moderate verbal and minimal written cues.
  3. The patient will recall sentence-level information after a 30 minute delay using the spaced retrieval technique.
  4. The patient will answer personal information using a memory book given intermittent moderate verbal cues.

Patients with moderate memory impairments

  1. The patient will recall 5 or more items (i.e. grocery list, medication list, etc.) after a 30 minute delay given intermittent minimal verbal cues.
  2. The patient will recall 100% of memory strategies given occasional minimal verbal cues.
  3. The patient will complete a daily journal given occasional moderate cues.
  4. The patient will read paragraph level information and answer questions about the material at 80% accuracy after a 5 minute delay.

Patients with mild memory impairments

  1. The patient will recall page level information and answer questions about the material at 80% accuracy given occasional visual cues after a 30 minute delay.
  2. The patient will recall medication names, purposes, times taken, and dosages at 80% accuracy given occasional visual cues.
  3. The patient will recall 7 or more items at 80% accuracy after a 60 minute delay given minimal verbal cues.
  4. The patient will utilize “write it down” while presented with auditory instructions and recall 80% of the information given use of written notes only.

Attention Goal Bank

Patients with severe attention impairments

  1. The patient will sustain attention to sentence-long written information in 80% of opportunities.
  2. The patient will sustain attention to a 5 minute task in a quiet environment given frequent moderate verbal cues to attend.
  3. The patient will sustain attention to a meal for 5 minutes given frequent moderate verbal cues and frequent moderate visual cues to attend.

Patients with moderate attention impairments

  1. The patient will selectively attend to auditory information for 10 minutes given intermittent moderate verbal cues to attend.
  2. The patient will sustain attention to visual information for 20 minutes in a quiet environment given intermittent minimal verbal cues and intermittent moderate visual cues to attend.
  3. The patient will require 10 or fewer minimal verbal cues to attend to a 10 minute task.

Patients with mild attention impairments

  1. The patient will require 5 or fewer minimal verbal cues to attend to a 30 minute conversation in a noisy environment.
  2. The patient will selectively attend to visual information for 45 minutes given occasional minimal verbal cues to attend.
  3. The patient will complete alternating attention tasks (e.g. take notes while the therapist dictates information) given 10 or fewer requests for repetition.
  4. That patient will complete alternating attention tasks at 80% accuracy given intermittent minimal verbal cues to attend in a noisy environment.

Problem Solving Goal Bank

Patients with severe problem solving impairments

  1. The patient will complete basic problem solving tasks related to safety (e.g. use of call light) at 80% accuracy given frequent moderate verbal cues.
  2. The patient will complete simple math problems at 80% accuracy given use of calculator and/or paper and pen and intermittent moderate verbal cues.
  3. The patient will identify safe versus unsafe situations in 80% of opportunities given frequent moderate verbal cues.

Patients with moderate problem solving impairments

  1. The patient will complete moderate problem solving tasks r/t money management (e.g., calculating totals, calculating days until bills are due) at 80% accuracy given intermittent moderate verbal and minimal written cues.
  2. The patient will sort 3 or more medications into a pill box given use of medication list and frequent minimal verbal and frequent minimal visual cues.
  3. The patient will generate solutions to unsafe situations in 80% of opportunities given occasional minimal verbal cues.
  4. The patient will complete sequencing tasks with 5 or fewer steps at 80% accuracy given intermittent minimal verbal cues.

Patients with mild problem solving impairments

  1. The patient will sort all medications into a pill box at 100% accuracy given use of medication list and rare visual cues.
  2. The patient will solve complex money management (e.g. balance a checkbook) tasks at 90% accuracy given occasional minimal verbal cues.
  3. The patient will generate 3 or more meal plans for one week given intermittent minimal verbal cues.
  4. The patient will listen to and delete voicemails following the sequence at 80% accuracy given intermittent minimal verbal cues.

Visual Neglect Goal Bank

Patients with severe visual neglect

  1. The patient will read phrase level information aloud at 80% accuracy given intermittent minimal verbal cues.
  2. The patient will complete a simple maze within 10 minutes given 10 or fewer moderate verbal and moderate visual cues.
  3. The patient will complete simple a word search puzzles (6×6 or smaller) within 10 minutes given intermittent moderate verbal cues.

Patients with moderate visual neglect

  1. The patient will read sentence level information aloud at 80% accuracy given intermittent minimal verbal cues.
  2. The patient will locate 5 or more items in a single page grocery ad within 15 minutes given intermittent minimal verbal cues.
  3. The patient will write phrase level information from dictation using lined paper at 80% legibility given frequent minimal verbal cues.

Patients with mild visual neglect

  1. The patient will read paragraph level information aloud at 80% accuracy given occasional minimal verbal cues for use of strategies.
  2. The patient will complete written questionnaire at 80% accuracy given intermittent minimal verbal and occasional minimal visual cues.
  3. The patient will navigate a building using a map at 80% accuracy given occasional minimal verbal cues.


Writing Aphasia (Expression) Goals – Factors to Consider

Response Modality

  • Spoken
  • Written

Response Length

  • Words
  • Phrases
  • Sentences
  • Paragraphs
  • Conversation
  • Pages

Response Time

  • Usually measured by seconds

Aphasia (Expression) Goal Bank

Patients with severe expressive aphasia

  1. The patient will name common household objects at 80% accuracy given frequent maximum verbal and frequent maximum phonemic cues.
  2. The patient will name body parts at 80% accuracy given frequent maximum verbal and frequent maximum phonemic cues.
  3. The patient will name simple line drawings at 80% accuracy given frequent maximum verbal and frequent maximum phonemic cues.
  4. The patient will complete sentences with an appropriate word at 80% accuracy given frequent maximum verbal and frequent maximum phonemic cues.
  5. The patient will name items from description at 80% accuracy given frequent maximum verbal and frequent maximum phonemic cues.

Patients with moderate expressive aphasia

  1. The patient will complete sentences with two or more appropriate words at 80% accuracy given frequent maximum verbal and frequent maximum phonemic cues.
  2. The patient will generate sentences with 3 or more words in response to a situation at 80% accuracy given frequent maximum verbal and frequent maximum phonemic cues.
  3. The patient will name abstract words and phrases from description at 80% accuracy given frequent maximum verbal and frequent maximum phonemic cues.
  4. The patient will participate in simple conversation at 80% accuracy given frequent maximum verbal and frequent maximum phonemic cues.

Patients with mild expressive aphasia

  1. The patient will describe visual scenes using 3 or more sentences at 80% accuracy given frequent maximum verbal and frequent maximum phonemic cues.
  2. The patient will participate in complex conversation at 80% accuracy given frequent maximum verbal and frequent maximum phonemic cues.
  3. The patient will generate a monologue from a prompt (e.g. “tell me about the pros and cons of living in Hawaii”) with 5 or more sentences at 80% accuracy given frequent maximum verbal and frequent maximum phonemic cues.


Writing Aphasia (Receptive) Goals – Factors to Consider

Presentation Modality

  • Reading
  • Listening
  • Viewing pictures

Response Modality

  • Gestures (pointing)
  • Speaking

Question Complexity

  • Single words
  • Simple color drawings
  • Phrases
  • Black and white line drawings
  • Sentences
  • Visual scenes
  • Conversation

Aphasia (Receptive) Goal Bank

Patients with severe receptive aphasia

  1. The patient will identify the correct word given 2 choices at 80% accuracy given frequent maximal visual cues.
  2. The patient will follow simple body commands presented auditorily at 80% accuracy given frequent maximal visual cues.
  3. The patient will answer simple biographical yes/no questions presented auditorily at 80% accuracy given frequent maximal visual cues.
  4. The patient will identify body parts at 80% accuracy given frequent maximal visual cues.
  5. The patient will follow 1-step commands with 2 components (e.g., “place your hand on your knee”, “tap your foot twice”) at 80% accuracy given frequent maximal visual cues.
  6. The patient will identify the correct picture in a field of 4 when presented with the word auditorily at 80% accuracy given frequent maximal visual cues.

Patients with moderate receptive aphasia

  1. The patient will answer abstract yes/no questions (e.g., “is fire hot?”, “are there 6 days in one week?”) at 80% accuracy given frequent maximal visual cues.
  2. The patient will follow 2-step commands with 3 or fewer components (e.g. tap your right knee twice) at 80% accuracy given frequent maximal visual cues.
  3. The patient will identify the correct phrase in a field of 2 when presented with the phrase auditorily at 80% accuracy given frequent maximal visual cues.
  4. The patient will read 2 or more sentences and answer comprehension questions r/t the material at 80% accuracy given frequent maximal visual cues.

Patients with mild receptive aphasia

  1. The patient will follow 3-step commands at 80% accuracy given frequent maximal visual cues.
  2. The patient will read paragraphs and answer comprehension questions at 80% accuracy given frequent maximal visual cues.
  3. The patient will listen to 2 or more sentences and answer comprehension questions presented auditorily at 80% accuracy given frequent maximal visual cues.
  4. The patient will participate in simple conversation at 80% accuracy given frequent maximal visual cues.


Writing Dysarthria Goals – Factors to Consider

Targeted Subsystem

  • Respiration
  • Phonation
  • Articulation
  • Prosody

Presentation Modality

  • Verbal
  • Written

Response Length

  • Word
  • Multisyllabic word
  • Phrase
  • Sentences
  • Simple conversation
  • Monologues
  • Complex conversation

Dysarthria Goal Bank

Patients with severe dysarthria

  1. The patient will produce vowel sounds with appropriate voicing in 80% of opportunities given frequent maximal verbal cues.
  2. The patient will produce phrases with 5 or fewer words in one breath in 80% of opportunities given frequent maximal verbal cues to utilize breathing strategies.
  3. The patient will repeat phrases at 80% intelligibility given frequent maximal verbal cues to utilize clear speech strategies.
  4. The patient will produce phrases with appropriate stress in 80% of opportunities given frequent maximal verbal cues.
  5. The patient will complete prolonged “ah” for 4 or more seconds in 80% of opportunities given frequent cues to “talk loud.”

Patients with moderate dysarthria

  1. The patient will produce sentences with 7 or more words by placing pauses in appropriate places in 80% of opportunities given frequent maximal verbal cues.
  2. The patient will produce sentences with 7 or more words at 80% intelligibility given frequent maximal verbal cues to utilize clear speech strategies.
  3. The patient will produce sentences with appropriate stress in 80% of opportunities given frequent maximal verbal cues.
  4. The patient will read 10 functional phrases at 80% intelligibility given frequent verbal cues to “talk loud.”

Patients with mild dysarthria

  1. The patient will produce multiple sentences placing pauses in appropriate places in 80% of opportunities given frequent maximal verbal cues.
  2. The patient will participate in conversation at 80% intelligibility given frequent maximal verbal cues to utilize clear speech strategies.
  3. The patient will complete monologues at least 3 minutes long at 80% intelligibility given frequent maximal verbal cues to utilize clear speech strategies.


Writing Apraxia of Speech Goals – Factors to Consider

Presentation modality

  • Verbal
  • Written

Response Length

  • Single phoneme
  • Word
  • Multisyllabic word
  • Phrase
  • Sentence
  • Paragraphs
  • Conversation
  • Monologue

Phoneme and Word Position

  • Initial
  • Final
  • Medial

Apraxia of Speech Goal Bank

Patients with severe apraxia of speech

  1. The patient will produce bilabial CV sounds (e.g., ba, pa, ma) at 80% accuracy given frequent maximal phonemic placement cues.
  2. The patient will produce /b/ initial words at 80% accuracy given frequent maximal phonemic placement cues.
  3. The patient will produce /s/ final words at 80% accuracy given frequent maximal phonemic placement cues.
  4. The patient will produce /t/ medial words at 80% accuracy given frequent maximal phonemic placement cues.
  5. The patient will say functional words (e.g., water, toilet) at 80% accuracy given frequent maximal phonemic placement cues.

Patients with moderate apraxia of speech

  1. The patient will produce phrases containing /b/ medial words at 80% accuracy given frequent moderate phonemic placement cues.
  2. The patient will produce phrases containing multisyllabic /s/ final words at 80% accuracy given frequent moderate phonemic placement cues.
  3. The patient will say functional phrases (e.g., more water, hot food) at 80% accuracy given frequent moderate phonemic placement cues.
  4. The patient will produce sentences in response to a question (e.g. what’s your favorite holiday and why) with appropriate articulation at 80% accuracy given frequent moderate phonemic placement cues.

Patients with mild apraxia of speech

  1. The patient will participate in simple conversation with appropriate articulation at 80% accuracy given intermittent minimal verbal cues.
  2. The patient will produce a monologue with appropriate articulation at 80% accuracy given intermittent minimal verbal cues.
  3. The patient will participate in complex conversation at 80% accuracy given intermittent minimal verbal cues.


Writing Voice & Resonance Goals – Factors to Consider

Targeted Subsystem

  • Respiration
  • Phonation
  • Resonance

Voice & Resonance Goal Bank

Patients with severe voice & resonance impairments

  1. The patient will produce easy onset words (e.g. /h/ initial) with appropriate voicing in 80% of opportunities given frequent maximal verbal cues.
  2. The patient will produce non-nasal words with appropriate resonance in 80% of opportunities given frequent maximal verbal cues.
  3. The patient will repeat words at 70dB or higher speech loudness in 80% of opportunities given frequent maximal verbal cues.
  4. The patient will produce tense vowels within single words (e.g., nay, cake, seat) with appropriate voicing in 80% of opportunities given frequent maximal verbal cues.
  5. The patient will repeat minimal pair voiced/voiceless words with appropriate voicing in 80% of opportunities given frequent maximal verbal cues.
  6. The patient will complete neck and shoulder exercises at 80% accuracy given occasional moderate verbal cues.

Patients with moderate voice & resonance impairments

  1. The patient will read sentences loaded with tense vowels using appropriate voicing in 80% of opportunities given intermittent moderate verbal cues to utilize voice strategies.
  2. The patient will read sentences with nasal and non-nasal words with appropriate resonance in 80% of opportunities given intermittent moderate verbal cues.
  3. The patient will produce phrases in response to a question with appropriate voicing in 80% of opportunities given intermittent cues to utilize “open mouth” technique.
  4. The patient will read aloud for 5 or more minutes with an average of 70dB or higher speech loudness given frequent minimal verbal cues to “talk loud.”

Patients with mild voice & resonance impairments

  1. The patient will read paragraphs with appropriate voicing in 80% of opportunities given occasional minimal verbal cues to utilize voice strategies.
  2. The patient will participate in complex conversation with appropriate resonance in 80% of opportunities given occasional minimal verbal cues.
  3. The patient will complete monologues that are 5 minutes or longer with an average of 80dB or higher speech loudness given occasional minimal verbal cues to “talk loud.”


Writing AAC Goals – Factors to Consider

Underlying Impairment

  • Aphasia
  • Voice or Motor Speech Impairment
  • Other physical impairment

Response Length

  • Single words
  • Phrases
  • Sentences
  • Paragraphs
  • Monologues
  • Conversation

Communication Partner

  • Main facilitator (e.g., spouse, caregiver)
  • Familiar listener
  • Unfamiliar listener

Response Time

  • Usually measured by a seconds

AAC Goal Bank

Simple AAC Goals

  1. The patient will repeat single words using a speech generating device in 80% of opportunities given frequent maximal verbal and maximal visual cues.
  2. The patient will type single words with 7 or fewer letters at 80% accuracy given frequent maximal verbal and maximal visual cues in order to communicate basic wants and needs.
  3. The patient will answer simple biographical questions at 80% accuracy given frequent maximal verbal and maximal visual cues.
  4. The patient will produce automatic phrases (e.g., days of the week, counting) using an eye gaze system at 80% accuracy given frequent maximal verbal and maximal visual cues.

Moderate AAC Goals

  1. The patient will add new vocabulary to speech generating device at 80% accuracy given frequent moderate verbal and moderate visual cues in order to communicate wants and needs.
  2. The patient will initiate 3 or more times during a simple 5 minute conversation with a familiar communication partner given frequent moderate verbal and moderate visual cues.
  3. The patient will generate a sentence with 5 or more words within 1 minute given frequent moderate verbal and moderate visual cues.

Complex AAC Goals

  1. The patient will create a monologue (e.g., introduction, biographical information) with 3 or more sentences within 5 minutes given occasional minimal verbal and minimal visual cues in order to communicate complex thoughts and feelings.
  2. The patient will initiate 5 or more times during a 5 minute conversation with an unfamiliar communication partner given intermittent moderate visual cues.
  3. The patient will respond to a question posed by a familiar communication partner within 7 seconds using a switch system in 80% of opportunities given intermittent minimal verbal cues.


Writing Fluency Goals – Factors to Consider

Response Length

  • Single word
  • Phrase
  • Sentence
  • Paragraph
  • Conversation
  • Monologue

Dysfluency Occurence

  • Only on the initial sound of a word
  • Only on certain sounds
  • Only on certain sounds in certain positions
  • Only on the initial sound of the initial word in a sentence
  • Only on the phone
  • Only with certain people
  • Only during work meetings

Fluency Goal Bank

Patients with severe fluency impairment

  1. The patient will produce single words containing /f/ medial at 80% accuracy using the breath curve and frequent moderate verbal cues.
  2. The patient will produce phrases containing /s/ initial words at 80% accuracy using the breath curve and frequent moderate verbal cues.
  3. The patient will produce “th” heavy sentences at 80% accuracy using the breath curve and frequent moderate verbal cues

Patients with moderate fluency impairment

  1. The patient will produce “j” heavy sentences at 80% accuracy given frequent minimal verbal cues.
  2. The patient will produce two or more sentences in response to a question posed by an unfamiliar listener with appropriate fluency in 80% of opportunities given intermittent minimal verbal cues.
  3. The patient will read paragraphs aloud with appropriate fluency in 80% of opportunities given intermittent minimal verbal cues.
  4. The patient will participate in simple conversation with a familiar listener with appropriate fluency in 80% of opportunities given intermittent minimal verbal cues.

Patients with mild fluency impairment

  1. The patient will participate in complex conversation with an unfamiliar listener with appropriate fluency in 80% of opportunities given occasional minimal verbal cues.
  2. The patient will order a meal over the telephone with an unfamiliar listener with appropriate fluency in 80% of opportunities given intermittent minimal verbal cues.
  3. The patient will deliver a monologue (e.g. project update during work meeting) with appropriate fluency in 80% of opportunities given use of breath curve.

In Conclusion…

  • You are an awesome speech therapist!
  • Goals should be S.M.A.R.T.
    • Specific
    • Measurable
    • Attainable
    • Relevant
    • Timely
  • Goals should be individualized to each patient (based on your assessment and other relevant client factors)
  • Good luck!
Virtual Speech Therapy Patient Handouts SLP Treatment Forms image 0
The Home Health SLP Handbook: Everything you need to provide speech therapy to adults in the home health setting. by [Chung Hwa Brewer, Miwa Aparo]



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